SNL PREMIERE: TINA FEY AS SARAH PALIN

FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

If I’m ever at home on a Saturday night (an exceedingly rare occurrence), then let’s just say I’m…entertaining. So to speak.

True to form, I wasn’t home last Saturday. So I didn’t see this.

But my wonderful friend NICK PLOWMAN alerted me. He put a link up in my PINK SAYS SARAH PALIN “HATES WOMEN” thread (it’s right here ) and there’s also one over at his fantastic film blog FATACULTURE

After wild conjecture over who would play John McCain’s running mate on SNL, TINA FEY returned to her old show for an opening sketch featuring her as Governor Sarah Palin and cohost AMY POEHLER as HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON.

The NBC comedy program’s season premiere opened Saturday with a “nonpartisan message” where the two pleaded for an end to sexism in the presidential campaigns, which have seen Ms. Palin enjoy sudden popularity after Ms. Rodham Clinton’s loss to BARACK OBAMA for the Democratic nomination.

“I didn’t want a woman to be President. I wanted to be President,” said Ms. Poehler, reprising her characterization of SENATOR RODHAM CLINTON.

Many have said that Ms. Fey bears a striking resemblance to Ms. Palin, a comparison alluded to the sketch. A frustrated Ms. Rodham Clinton broke down, complaining about Ms. Palin’s ease of ascendance and her “Tina Fey glasses”.

A few digs were made about Ms. Palin being less experienced than Ms. Rodham Clinton. As Ms. Poehler’s RODHAM CLINTON bragged about her foreign policy experience, Ms. Fey’s Alaskan governor exclaimed: “I can see Russia from my house!”

When Ms. Poehler said she disagreed with the Bush doctrine, Ms. Fey’s Palin remarked, “I don’t know what that means.” It was a reference to Ms. Palin’s apparent confusion on the subject in her first major interview last week on ABC.

Ms. Poehler wrapped up the sketch: “In conclusion, I invite the media to grow a pair. And if you can’t, I will lend you mine.”

SNL returned early this fall for its 34th season, in part to capitalize on the presidential campaigns. Historically, the show has had particular relevance with its political parodies.

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