OSCARS 2010 RECAP






FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Well, the ACADEMY AWARDS turned out to be a shattering disappointment.

Let me tell you why. Please bear with me.

First of all, they’re getting to be much too predictable in the top categories. Everything went like clockwork.

If the majority of the films and people you’re rooting for end up in that rarefied atmosphere, then that’s just dandy. If they don’t, then you’re praying for an upset.

It didn’t happen.

The show itself was quite good. It was classy, elegant and went very smooothly. STEVE MARTIN and Alec Baldwin were terrific hosts. NEIL PATRICK HARRIS’ opening just killed.

So what the hell am I complaining about? Well, the winners…

JEFF BRIDGES and CHRISTOPH WALTZ were my #1 choices. I was thrilled to bits for both of them.

The Dude abides. Now he’s also got an ACADEMY AWARD to his name.

Mo’NIQUE was my #2 selection. Right after VERA FARMIGA. But she was eminently deserving. She was much too powerful to be ignored.

However…

I fully expected (AT THE VERY LEAST) that QUENTIN TARANTINO and JASON REITMAN would take the screenplay awards home. They both lost.

INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS – a masterful, incendiary concoction of wicked brilliance – only received one OSCAR. UP IN THE AIR (a fabulous hard hitting comedy with topical overtones and great insight into modern relationships) was shut out completely.

The Hurt Locker is just not my jar of jelly. The acting is the only thing that puts it ahead of the pack. But clearly nothing could derail it. (I have no idea why.) The only other BEST PICTURE nominee that I loathe more is A Serious Man.

KATHRYN BIGELOW, like SANDRA BULLOCK, seems to be a lovely down to earth person. They both looked fantastic and they gave very sincere heartfelt speeches.

I’m a feminist. I should be happy that a woman finally won BEST DIRECTOR. But I can’t be. I feel that QUENTIN was robbed. JASON and LEE DANIELS also did work that was superlative.

In terms of SANDRA’S competition, I’m not worried about the brilliant HELEN MIRREN. She’s won recently and she will likely emerge victorious again.

GABBY and CAREY are young. They have lots of time. At this stage, their nominations are their awards.

But MERYL…

Ms. Streep is a true goddess. She hasn’t won an OSCAR in nearly thirty years.

I just feel that the ACADEMY has taken MERYL completely for granted. How could this possibly happen to the greatest film actor – male or female – of the modern era?

Certainly her artistic contribution is worth far more than any accolades she acquires. But I find it so incredibly disheartening.

Though I own GONE WITH THE WIND, I managed to catch the last fifteen minutes on TV after I took a break from assembling and re editing this article.

I could always relate to SCARLETT. We have the same heritage and the identical take no prisoners temperament.

Some days you just have to drive until you see the sunshine glittering off your windshield. It may take a while. But it’ll be there eventually.

*shakes blonde mane*

After all, tomorrow is another day…

The Iraq War drama The Hurt Locker won BEST PICTURE and five other prizes Sunday evening at the ACADEMY AWARDS, its haul including BEST DIRECTOR for Kathryn Bigelow.

Ms. Bigelow is the first woman in the 82 year history of the OSCARS to earn Hollywood’s top prize for filmmakers.

Among those Ms. Bigelow and The Hurt Locker beat are ex husband James Cameron and his sci fi spectacle Avatar. Kathryn Bigelow and James Cameron were married from 1989 – 1991.

Mr. Cameron was seated right behind Ms. Bigelow at the ceremony and joined a standing ovation for her, clapping vigorously and exclaiming, “Yes! Yes!” after she won.

First time winners took all four acting prizes: JEFF BRIDGES as BEST ACTOR for CRAZY HEART, Sandra Bullock as BEST ACTRESS in The Blind Side, Mo’NIQUE as BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS in PRECIOUS and CHRISTOPH WALTZ as BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR for INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS.

The OSCAR marks a career peak for JEFF BRIDGES, a beloved Hollywood veteran who had been nominated four times in the previous 38 years without winning. JEFF, who played an alcoholic country singer trying to clean up his act, held his OSCAR aloft and thanked his late parents actor LLOYD BRIDGES and poet DOROTHY BRIDGES.

“Thank you, Mom and Dad, for turning me on to such a groovy profession,” JEFF said, recalling how his mother would get her children to entertain at parties and his father would sit on the bed teaching him the basics of acting for an early role he landed on his dad’s TV show Sea Hunt.

“I feel like an extension of them. This is honouring them as much as it is me.”

Backstage, JEFF clutched his OSCAR in one hand and a glass of champagne in the other. Asked to assess his life and career, he invoked his character in THE BIG LEBOWSKI.

“Ups and downs. What does The Dude say? Strikes and gutters, man.”

He sipped his drink at times and raised his glass as if to toast reporters before leaving an interview room.

The SUPPORTING ACTOR winners capped a remarkable year, Mo’NIQUE startling fans with dramatic depths previously unsuspected in the actor known for lowbrow comedy and the Austrian born CHRISTOPH WALTZ leaping to fame with his first big Hollywood role.

“I would like to thank the Academy for showing that it can be about the performance and not the politics,” stated Mo’NIQUE, who played the heartless, abusive welfare mother of an illiterate teen in the Harlem drama PRECIOUS.

Mo’NIQUE added her gratitude to the first black female actor to win an OSCAR, HATTIE McDANIEL, the 1939 SUPPORTING ACTRESS winner for GONE WITH THE WIND.

“I want to thank Ms. Hattie McDaniel for enduring all that she had to so that I would not have to.”

PRECIOUS also won the ADAPTED SCREENPLAY OSCAR for Geoffrey Fletcher.

Though a veteran stage and television actor in Europe, CHRISTOPH WALTZ had been a virtual unknown in Hollywood before QUENTIN TARANTINO cast him as the prattling, ruthless Jew hunter HANS LANDA in his Second World War saga.

“Quentin with his unorthodox methods of navigation, this fearless explorer, took this ship across and brought it in with flying colours and that’s why I’m here. This is your welcoming embrace and there’s no way I can ever thank you enough.”

Missing from the onstage celebration for The Hurt Locker win was producer Nicolas Chartier, who was banned by the ACADEMY from attending the OSCARS because of emails he sent urging members to vote for his movie – an ACADEMY violation.

THE COVE, an investigation into grisly dolphin fishing operations in Japan, was picked as BEST DOCUMENTARY.

GEORGE CLOONEY knows the kind of career boost that winning an OSCAR can bring. It happened to him in 2005, as the SUPPORTING ACTOR winner for Syriana.

He went into Sunday’s ACADEMY AWARDS with a good idea of what wasn’t going to happen for him and his nominated UP IN THE AIR costars.

“It’s probably not going to be Vera or Anna and it’s certainly not going to be me,” he said before going into the KODAK THEATRE.

“But what you do know is that a nomination for Vera and Anna changes their careers. They will suddenly be first on the list to get jobs and that is a tremendous jump.”

GEORGE was accompanied by his girlfriend, Italian actor ELISABETTA CANALIS. Tucked inside his tuxedo was a little treat to get through the long ceremony – a sterling flask with his monogram GTC.

There are many reasons why GEORGE CLOONEY is one of the most popular stars in Hollywood.

But he’s also one of the most generous celebrities on the red carpet circuit. He bounded across the red ropes Sunday to the bleachers with a pen in hand, ready to shake hands and sign autographs. The fans leaped out of their seats to get a glimpse of him, pressing towards the carpet that ran into the KODAK THEATRE.

After he signed a woman’s security badge, she held it up in the air triumphantly and fans cheered for her.

OSCAR hosts STEVE MARTIN and Alec Baldwin opened the show with playful ribbing of nominees. They also made note of OSCAR organizers’ decision to double the BEST PICTURE category from five films to 10.

Leaders of the ACADEMY widened the BEST PICTURE category from the usual five films to expand the range of contenders for a ceremony whose predictability had turned it into a humdrum affair for TV audiences.

OSCAR ratings fell to an all time low two years ago and rebounded a bit last year.

The overhaul continued this season with a show that farmed out time consuming lifetime achievement honours to a separate event last fall and hired STEVE MARTIN and Alec Baldwin as the first dual OSCAR hosts in 23 years.

THE WINNERS IN THE MAJOR CATEGORIES…

BEST PICTURE
THE HURT LOCKER

BEST ACTOR
JEFF BRIDGES – CRAZY HEART

BEST ACTRESS
SANDRA BULLOCK – THE BLIND SIDE

SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Mo’NIQUE – PRECIOUS

SUPPORTING ACTOR
CHRISTOPH WALTZ – INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS

BEST DIRECTOR
KATHRYN BIGELOW – THE HURT LOCKER

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
MARK BOAL – THE HURT LOCKER

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
GEOFFREY FLETCHER – PRECIOUS

FOREIGN FILM
THE SECRET IN THEIR EYES (ARGENTINA)

ANIMATED FILM
UP

ART DIRECTION
AVATAR

CINEMATOGRAPY
AVATAR

VISUAL EFFECTS
AVATAR

EDITING
THE HURT LOCKER

COSTUME DESIGN
THE YOUNG VICTORIA

MAKEUP
STAR TREK

ORIGINAL SCORE
UP

ORIGINAL SONG
THE WEARY KIND – CRAZY HEART

DOCUMENTARY
THE COVE

2 Responses to “OSCARS 2010 RECAP”

  1. thank god or whomever avatar didn’t get best picture.

  2. Yeah, I didn’t care for Avatar, glim.

    I hated The Hurt Locker even more.

    Hey, if that’s their BEST PICTURE, good for them.

    It ain’t mine. By a long shot.

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